Amy Niang is a lecturer in international relations at the University of the Witwatersrand, South Africa, as well as program director of the Pan-African Cultural and Research Institute, Senegal. She is a political scientist with an interest in three broad areas, namely, the history of state formation and related ideas of sovereignty, statehood, community, and order, Africa’s International Relations, and the Geopolitics of the Sahel. She obtained an MA in political economy at the University of Tsukuba, Japan, and a PhD in politics and international relations at the University of Edinburgh, United Kingdom. Her dissertation examined state and social processes in the Voltaic region of West Africa between the 16th and 19th centuries. Dr. Niang is a recipient of an African Peacebuilding Network 2013 research grant.

Radar | November 22, 2016

South Africa’s Withdrawal from the Rome Statute: A Commentary on Moral Equivalence in International Relations

Although not entirely unexpected, South Africa’s announcement that it had taken steps to withdraw from the Rome Statute, the founding treaty of the International Criminal Court (ICC), has baffled many observers. South Africa is generally seen as a champion of human rights, given its liberal constitution, the existence of a strong civil society advocacy for […]

South Africa’s withdrawal is due to take effect a year after the United Nations Secretary General receives notification from government. Photo: Flickr
South Africa’s withdrawal is due to take effect a year after the United Nations Secretary General receives notification from government. Photo: Flickr
Radar | November 7, 2014

The Day the Burkinabé People Recovered Their Voice

“As political leaders scramble to capture every bit of power possible, it needs to be remembered that the impetus for change was collective anger …. For the Burkinabé people, this is a unique chance to experiment with inclusive politics that makes room for meaningful civil society input and, more importantly, an opportunity to dismantle a system of rule that enabled Compaoré to keep the country under tight control for twenty-seven years.”

Photo credit to Flickr user European Commission DG ECHO. Taken on November 5, 2012 in Sebba, Burkina Faso. This picture is licensed under CC BY-NC-ND 4.0. No changes were made. Original photo: https://www.flickr.com/photos/69583224@N05/8641801647
A group of Burkinabé women and children wait in line.