Viewpoint | June 24, 2017

Life as an APN Alumnus: An Interview with Professor Audrey Gadzekpo

Professor Audrey Gadzekpo, an Alumnus (Individual Research Grant 2014) of the Social Science Research Council’s African Peacebuilding Network (APN), has just launched her book, Conflict-Sensitive Coverage: A Manual for Journalists Reporting Conflict in West Africa, on June 22, 2017, at the Legon Centre for International Affairs and Diplomacy, University of Ghana – Legon, Accra, Ghana. […]

Professor Audrey Gadzekpo at Wiston House
Viewpoint | May 12, 2016

The Role of Journalists in Improving Media Coverage of Conflict and Peacebuilding in West Africa

“Journalists should let the stories tell themselves; if you tell a compelling story, people will get it. They just have to trust that people will get it and be moved enough to do something.”

Photo credit to Dagan Rossini. Taken on March 30, 2016. CC BY-NC-ND 2.0. No changes were made. Original photo: https://www.flickr.com/photos/apn-ssrc/26094807050/in/album-72157667501548595/
Journalists from across West Africa participated in a media training workshop in Accra, Ghana, with support from the African Peacebuilding Network.
Essays | September 30, 2015

Mediating Electoral Violence in a Polarized Society: The Case of Zimbabwe

“Although the media…are expected to observe, investigate, and subsequently report news as objectively as possible, these institutions are powerful political and cultural actors, influenced by political and economic forces to take subjective positions. In a polarized environment such as Zimbabwe, they are not neutral arbiters of electoral information and images. Rather, the media carry the most basic characteristics of the journalism of war and violence: their reporting is propaganda oriented, elite oriented, and victory oriented.”

Photo credit to DoC via Flickr user GovernmentZA. Taken on February 17, 2015. CC BY-ND 2.0. No changes were made. Original photo: https://www.flickr.com/photos/governmentza/16281309174/
Zimbabwean president Robert Mugabe.
Essays | May 11, 2015

Press Freedoms and the Need to Repeal Draconian Media Legislation in Tanzania

“Press freedom is an important element of the democratization process. The freedom to report critically and question decisions promotes transparency and accountability and helps build robust, open, and democratic institutions …. Increased media freedoms and citizens’ access to information are essential to attaining these goals and consolidating democratic governance and political stability.”

Photo credit to Flickr user David Brewer. Taken on April 10, 2014. This photo is licensed under CC BY-SA 4.0. Image cropped to fit frame. Original photo: https://www.flickr.com/photos/breweruk/13758205514/
Newspaper journalists in Tanzania discuss online multi-platform strategies.