Viewpoint | January 16, 2018

Life as an APN Alumnus: An Interview with Dr. Rawia Tawfik

The Social Science Research Council’s African Peacebuilding Network (APN) had the opportunity to sit down with Dr. Rawia Tawfik, a 2017 Individual Research Grant recipient. This interview was conducted on June 21, 2017, during the APN 2017 Training Workshop on Research Methods in Accra, Ghana. It has been edited for length and clarity. APN: Could you […]

Rawia Tawfik at Rabat Workshop
Rawia Tawfik at the 2017 APN Writing and Dissemination Workshop in Rabat, Morocco. Photo credit: Jennifer Sherys-Rivet.
Zimbabwe | November 1, 2017

Next Generation Social Sciences in Africa: A Stepping Stone for Emerging Scholars in Africa

This is a cross-post from Research Matters, a digital forum that focuses on emerging research in the social sciences by those who have been recipients of Social Science Research Council funding. Ruth Murambadoro is a three-time recipient of the Next Generation Social Sciences in Africa fellowship, and is the first PhD candidate working on transitional justice and […]

Ruth Next Gen cross post
Zimbabwe | February 17, 2017

Silence and Denial as Impediments to Peace in Post-Colonial Zimbabwe, 1980-2016

Introduction This appraisal is an interlocution of the twin cultures of silence and denial inherent in Zimbabwe’s post-colonial peacebuilding praxis. It evokes the exigency of placing victimhood, rather than political expediency, at the center of the country’s post-conflict architecture. Zimbabwe’s episodic cycles of violence are customarily resolved through state-mediated reconciliation pronouncements (1980), amnesty ordinances (1979, […]

A participant at an International Citizen Service's workshop on eliminating gender-based violence in Mutare, Zimbabwe. Photo credit to Gyan Gurung, Flickr user International Citizen Service. Taken on November 25, 2015 in Mutare, Zimbabwe. CC BY 2.0. No modifications have been made. Original photo: https://www.flickr.com/photos/icsuk/31348744121/in/photolist-dAKkhf-hE5oza-yo5YZa-bsxocA-dAKjME-dyYvBd-hKCsJs-8KENN9-PLbvsi.
A participant at an International Citizen Service's workshop on eliminating gender-based violence in Mutare, Zimbabwe. Photo credit to Gyan Gurung, Flickr user International Citizen Service. Taken on November 25, 2015 in Mutare, Zimbabwe. CC BY 2.0. No modifications have been made. Original photo: https://www.flickr.com/photos/icsuk/31348744121/in/photolist-dAKkhf-hE5oza-yo5YZa-bsxocA-dAKjME-dyYvBd-hKCsJs-8KENN9-PLbvsi.
Essays | September 30, 2015

Mediating Electoral Violence in a Polarized Society: The Case of Zimbabwe

“Although the media…are expected to observe, investigate, and subsequently report news as objectively as possible, these institutions are powerful political and cultural actors, influenced by political and economic forces to take subjective positions. In a polarized environment such as Zimbabwe, they are not neutral arbiters of electoral information and images. Rather, the media carry the most basic characteristics of the journalism of war and violence: their reporting is propaganda oriented, elite oriented, and victory oriented.”

Photo credit to DoC via Flickr user GovernmentZA. Taken on February 17, 2015. CC BY-ND 2.0. No changes were made. Original photo: https://www.flickr.com/photos/governmentza/16281309174/
Zimbabwean president Robert Mugabe.
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